Knowledge Management

Knowledge

05 juillet 2019

What is Knowledge Sharing?

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Patrick Lambe[Edit][Delete]: What is Knowledge Sharing?, Green Chameleon [Edit][Delete] July 17, 2006

A couple of good reflections on knowledge sharing, including this one on types of knowledge sharing ("A pop fan sets up a website about her favourite Taiwanese boy band") and the follow-up on the reasons why we share knowledge. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:22 - - Permalien [#]


04 juillet 2019

Beyond Bloom's Taxonomy: Rethinking Knowledge for the Knowledge Age

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Carl Bereiter and Marlene Scardamalia[Edit][Delete]: Beyond Bloom's Taxonomy: Rethinking Knowledge for the Knowledge Age, IKIT [Edit][Delete] July 10, 2006
This is an interesting idea. As Doug Belshaw comments, "The problem is that the bureaucrats who run education in many western education systems - the majority of whom have never taught - have an outdated conception of knowledge." He points to Louise Starkey, who observes that this conception "...was based on an underlying assumption that the mind behaves like a filing cabinet. This assumption is being challenged as the implications of learning in the digital age [are] explored further." She cites this paper, a 1998 proposal by Bereiter and Scardamalia that there are seven levels of increasingly sophisticated understandings of knowledge. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:55 - - Permalien [#]

22 juin 2019

EAIE New Knowledge Alert: June 2019

Screenshot-2018-5-3 EAIE

Summer in Europe is nearly around the corner, a period that offers many of us some well-deserved time out of the office and on holiday. As we hit the beach, head for some quiet in the countryside, or just take a break from our normal routines, reading for personal pleasure is often on the agenda. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:08 - - Permalien [#]

14 juin 2019

A Reading List for Aspiring Knowledge Workers

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Jim McGee[Edit][Delete]: A Reading List for Aspiring Knowledge Workers, March 3, 2006
OK, this is probably a pretty good list, but I would approach a reading list for knowledge workers very differently. For example, knowledge workers should be familiar with Hume's Treatise of Human Nature, Wittgenstein's On Certainty and Polanyi's Personal Knowledge. Throw in some Feyerabend and Lakatos to taste. Add Minsky's Society of Mind. Ronald Giere's Understanding Scientific Reasoning. Blend with Kenneth Clark's Civilisation and Patrick Watson's Struggle for Democracy. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:50 - - Permalien [#]

09 juin 2019

Apprenticeships are critical to America’s future as a knowledge economy

Techno-News BlogAn exciting trend is emerging in the US workforce: over half a million workers are using apprenticeships to acquire valuable experience and a pathway to a steady job. They’re earning money while learning critical, in-demand skills. In spite of this progress, a stigma remains. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:02 - - Permalien [#]


28 mai 2019

Connectivism and Connected Knowledge

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. George Siemens, Stephen Downes, Jeff Lebow and Dave Cormier[Edit][Delete]: Connectivism and Connected Knowledge, Elearnspace [Edit][Delete]ELearnSpace [Edit][Delete] February 1, 2006

[link: 2 Hits] George Siemens has posted a transcript of our conversation from Sunday. It's quite a good read (in my humble opinion). And it takes a lot less time to get through than listening to the audio. [Tags: ] [Comment] [Edit]. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 15:43 - - Permalien [#]

Improving reuse of design knowledge in a LMS

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Improving reuse of design knowledge in a LMS
David T. Jones, Creative dissatisfaction, 2019/01/30
This is an article that moves seamlessly from a problem with ugly text in Blackboard (who hasn't had that problem?) to a general commentary about the need to be able to develop and reuse design patterns in an LMS environment. This becomes even more critical, writesDavid T. Jones, as we consider the implications of next generation digital environments that involve the use of multiple applications in online learning. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 12:00 - - Permalien [#]

Supporting a Connected Galaxy of Knowledge

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Supporting a Connected Galaxy of Knowledge
Gaby Appleton, The Scholarly Kitchen, 2019/01/28
This post outlines four principles which ought to characterize the knowledge infrastructure in the future (quoted):

  1. the information system supporting research must be source-neutral.
  2. components from different providers in the information system supporting research should work together.
  3. transparency... researchers want to know how that recommendation was arrived at, and why it is relevant to them.
  4. we must put researchers in control. People should be able to set their own preferences and parameters.

Right now, we don't have this anywhere. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:12 - - Permalien [#]

Knowledge, Skill and Virtue Epistemology

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Knowlege, Skill and Virtue Epistemology
Duncan Pritchard, Handbook of Skill and Expertise, 2019/01/21
This is just one bit of Duncan Pritchard's voluminous output. It makes me think about the relation between knowledge, on the one hand, and the skill or virtues needed to produce knowledge on the other, in other words, between cognitive success and cognitive agency. "there is a way of thinking about knowledge that takes the idea that knowledge involves cognitive skill or ability as primary," writes Pritchard. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:59 - - Permalien [#]

24 mai 2019

An Introduction to Connective Knowledge - Audio Version

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web.Stephen Downes[Edit][Delete]: An Introduction to Connective Knowledge - Audio Version, January 4, 2006

Some people, when presented with this grey wall of text, would dive in with relish, but others will say, sensibly, "I'll wait for the movie." It's obviously hard to say, but it seems to me that this may be my most important paper. Right now, certainly, it's the most important to me. Sure, it's a bit loose, and could stand fewer typos, but it is the only drawn-out overview of my philosophy of learning and knowledge. So it seemed to me important to record an audio version of the paper, available here. It runs an hour and 34 minutes, so give yourself some time. Please enjoy this; without you, it could never have been written. [Tags: ] [Comment] [Edit] [Delete] [Spam]. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:52 - - Permalien [#]