open sources, open ressources, open edition, open university
22 novembre 2019

OpenSocial, Killer Apps and Regular People

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. OpenSocial, Killer Apps and Regular People
SixApart (LiveJournal, Movable Type, Vox) announces support for OpenSocial, writing "Honestly, we don't care much about the political battles between big tech companies: We're doing this because this is what it takes for new features, applications, and experiences to happen in the right way for the vast range of communities that we serve." MySpace has joined. Wired also weighs in quoting Jonathon Abrams: "Previous efforts like FOAF [friend of a friend] and OpenID were pretty complicated. For something to be useful from the user's perspective it has to be simple and easy." Meanwhile, view screenshots and screencasts from Marc Andreessen. There's a lot of figuring out to do. And I should also add that as I write there is a huge debate taking place in the open social graph community about whether the Google API is either open or social. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:57 - - Permalien [#]


When Educational Resources Are Open

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. When Educational Resources Are Open
Good analysis of what happens when educational resources are open (and, for that matter, why we want them to be open): "When educational resources become open into the natural intertwingularity of the Internet, their hierarchical tree forms, boxing into categories, and ordered sequences quickly break down." Creating open resourcs does not only change the structure of learning, or the structure of society, but it changes the structure of those resources themselves, and hence, of our understanding of what it means to know and to learn. "The only other place I know of where this kind of open connectivity happens is in your brain and mine. Ideas are patterns we connect from all sorts of parts and pieces floating around in memory and observation". More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:56 - - Permalien [#]

OpenID: Great Idea, Bewildering Consumer Experience

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. OpenID: Great Idea, Bewildering Consumer Experience
"It's way, way too hard to get started. All the sites supporting OpenID point curious users to the home page for the OpenID Foundation. From this site, it's actually stunningly difficult to find a link to a place where you can actually get an OpenID." Quite right. And don't even ask about the developer documentation. Things will get better, though. It's a very simple concept, at heart - one of these days I'll write an article giving my view on things, and maybe that will help. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:47 - - Permalien [#]

A Thread of Real-World Critique

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. A Thread of Real-World Critique
I thought this was a great example that combined communication and community, learning, the open market, and collective wisdom - all centered around the design, production and sale of t-shirts. Do take a look - in my view, some of these designs are amazing. Christian Long writes, "Wanna know why it matters that our kids/students 'test' their best ideas on the open market? Because they get legitimate feedback and not a single cute 'atta-boy' pat on the head. It's not about the grade". More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:35 - - Permalien [#]

15 novembre 2019

Open Education License Draft

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Open Education License Draft
Educational content is commercial content. That is the upshot, in my view, of David Wiley's launch of what he calls the 'Open Education License' draft. The license is, in essence, a Creative Commons license with no restrictions - it explicitly allows reproduction, distribution and derivative works, but does not restrict commercial use and does not even require attribution. This is a remarkable development because it signals, after eight years, a break from Creative Commons (which recently announced its own educational initiative). As I have argued in other posts, I do not support this sort of license for educational content because it permits others to block access to 'open' educational content. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:26 - - Permalien [#]


14 novembre 2019

Intro to Open Ed Class - Feedback and Enrolling

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Intro to Open Ed Class - Feedback and Enrolling
David Wiley has posted the syllabus to his upcoming course on open education. I think the readings are pretty good, overall, though I think the presentation in Week 7 (on licensing) is a bit one-sided. But I think it is well worth noting that I would not be in a position to make such a criticism were Wiley not willing to post his syllabus online. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 14:37 - - Permalien [#]

Waves of Innovation: From Open Source to Open Learning

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Waves of Innovation: From Open Source to Open Learning
Interesting article, mostly correct from my perspective, describing successive waves of commercial software, open source software, and open content, in (corporate) online learning. "This third wave is just visible on the horizon and includes technologies that are designed to be used by the learners themselves. The goal is collaborative learning, and there is no instructor per se. Every contributor is both a teacher and a student." I'm not totally convinced about every aspect of this description. See the chart near the top. I'm not sure 'value proposition' should be 'community', nor should key output be 'expertise maps' nor should the 'primary goal' be 'social networking'. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 13:50 - - Permalien [#]

13 novembre 2019

Open Library

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Open Library
The Open Library demo has launched. "What if there was a library which held every book? Not every book on sale, or every important book, or even every book in English, but simply every book-a key part of our planet's cultural legacy.... most importantly, such a library must be fully open. Not simply 'free to the people,' as the grand banner across the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh proclaims, but a product of the people: letting them create and curate its catalog, contribute to its content, participate in its governance, and have full, free access to its data. In an era where library data and Internet databases are being run by money-seeking companies behind closed doors, it's more important than ever to be open. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 13:16 - - Permalien [#]

The Quest for Sustainability in Open Courseware

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. The Quest for Sustainability in Open Courseware
I want to be sympathetic, because the author is working with limited information (specifically, his Oxford background, Chris Anderson's book on the long tail, and a podcast on OpenCourseWare). So I'm supporting of his working through the ideas that might lead to something like sustainable open educational resources. But I fear a paradigm shift might be in order. He writes, "the professor is the academic authority who should drive the decision-making subject to the authorisation of the institution." We already know what happens if we allow the professors to drive the decision-making: nothing. That's why Open Access advocates like Peter Suber and Stevan Harnad argue for open access mandates. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 13:06 - - Permalien [#]

A Recipe for OpenID-Enabling Your Site

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. A Recipe for OpenID-Enabling Your Site
Kind of a surprising place to find a useful article on OpenID, but if Plaxo is ever going to redeem itself (I received far too many Plaxo 'information requests' over the years) this is it. Of course, the stumbling block for many will be "Step 0: Install an OpenID consumer library". The site recommends the JanRain libraries; I can't speak for the other languages, but the JanRain Perl version involves a lot of grief. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 13:02 - - Permalien [#]