21 janvier 2020

Blogging Across the Disciplines: Integrating Technology to Enhance Liberal Learning

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Blogging Across the Disciplines: Integrating Technology to Enhance Liberal Learning
Discussion of the use of blogs in the classroom, including a study of a particular classroom. The most interesting aspects were the discussion of gender differences (males had no problems with the technology, but females reported problems) and the argument that blogging promotes "liberal education goals". More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:50 - - Permalien [#]


Toward a Model of Experiential E-Learning

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Toward a Model of Experiential E-Learning
This is an interesting enough paper in that it nicely summarizes experiential e-learning (sometimes called EE Learning), grounding it in the work of people like Carver and Cantor, who writes that "experiential education involves learning activities in which the student is directly engaged in the phenomena being studied." The author offers a taxonomy, which could be easily extended with a little reflection, and identifies as central concepts things like agency, belongingness and competence. The example offered is a bit of a stretch, though: the author describes graduate student engaging in EE learning by participating in the creation of an online course. While I appreciate recursion jokes as much as the next person, I thought this was a bit much. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:49 - - Permalien [#]

Information Literacy Professional Development Portal

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Information Literacy Professional Development Portal
OK, before I developed a portal, I would ask, "When is the last time I visited a portal?" And if the answer is in months, rather than years, I would ask, "What was it? What was I trying to accomplish?" I say it this way because - unless YouTibe is considered a portal - I haven't actually been to a portal for a very long time. Like, maybe, years. Which means that, even if you build a portal, if you want it to be used, you will have to think of it as something other than a portal. Like what? A feed? A community? A network? A channel. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:49 - - Permalien [#]

$1 Cdn = $1 US

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. $1 Cdn = $1 US
Just as I am about to embark on a trip to the United States (I leave Saturday) the Canadian dollar - fondly known as the 'Loonie' - is now worth the same as the U.S. dollar. This afternoon, for the first time since I was a teenager, it was worth more than the U.S. dollar. I'll leave the explanations to others (you can imagine what my own views are) and satisfy myself with observing that it means that the Canadian eLearning Enterprise Alliance (CeLEA) delegation, which will be well represented at the Brandon Hall conference next week, will have to come up with an innovative angle, since we can't sell Canadian e-learning on the basis of low cost any more. I was thinking: Canadian e-learning: expensive, but worth it. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:48 - - Permalien [#]

Russian OS to Be Installed in Every School

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Russian OS to Be Installed in Every School
This article isn't as clear as it could be but the gist seems to be that Russian software engineers will be adapting Linux and other open source software for use in Russian schools. This makes sense to me. Miguel Guhlen responds with a provocative post, questioning why American schools don't do the same. We could do without the war analogies, though. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:48 - - Permalien [#]


I Want My Eee PC!

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. I Want My Eee PC!
More angst about the OLPC, the price of which is not up to $188. Of course, prom my perspective, the prive has hardly budged at all. The Canadian dollar was around 70 cents when the project was announced. Now it's almost 99 cents. The price - in U.S. dollars - may be rising, but U.S. dollars are becoming cheaper and cheaper for me to buy. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:47 - - Permalien [#]

Strategy Letter VI

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Strategy Letter VI
Joel Spolsky serves up another hit, this time an insightful analysis of the future of Web 2.0 applications. In a nutshell: something like C for browsers, a pre-compiled framework that supports extended Javascript operations and runs in your browser. Yes, Javascript - not Java or any other 'sandbox' type language. And Google has two choices: be the company that makes this and gives it away, or be the company that is always playing catch up with its browser based applications. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:46 - - Permalien [#]

YouTube 101 - Yes, It'S a Real Class

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. YouTube 101 - Yes, It'S a Real Class
Nice bit of journalism from Andy Carvin as he examines the depths of a university course on YouTube. "The idea behind it is to engage a group of students around the culture of YouTube, while requiring them to use YouTube as one of the primary mechanisms for communicating during the semester." I don't think that the idea is as flaky as some of the commentators - communicating using only video, and especially within the constraints of YouTube video - is hard. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:46 - - Permalien [#]

Bebo Boomers Make a Stand

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Bebo Boomers Make a Stand
I've begin to see more cases like this, where people are using their contacts in social networks to organize. In this example, students in Scotland are using Bebo to save their schools. There's more. A Facebook campaign forced HSBC to reverse a policy and refund student charges. More on this here and here. And another Facebook campaign convinced Cadbury to restore the canceled Wispa candy bar. These are a welcome switch from the corporate and political advertising campaigns. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:45 - - Permalien [#]

Google Presentations: The New Google Docs Module

By Stephen Downes - Stephen's Web. Google Presentations: The New Google Docs Module
A lot of people are talking about the new Google presentation service. This article from Robin Good offers an overview. I set it up for myself and imported one of my presentations. The slide design is pretty basic, but I like being able to include the audience in the sidebar (I wish I could make the sidebar bigger). And I like the 'revisions' feature, which lets me go back to previous versions. What I'd really like is a slide library I can simply draw from to create presentations. But you can't even drag and drop slides inside presentations. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 09:45 - - Permalien [#]