26 novembre 2017

Plagiarism is rife in academia, so why is it rarely acknowledged?

The Guardian homeWhen a professor ripped off my work in a journal, they escaped unpunished. How can we expect academic originality from students if we don’t uphold it. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 18:01 - - Permalien [#]


Carrot or the stick? Technology and university plagiarism

The ConversationTrying to control and prevent plagiarism is a problem for all universities, and nearly all universities these days use some kind of technology to combat it. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:35 - - Permalien [#]

Fabricating and plagiarising: when researchers lie

The ConversationThere are a few things you might need for an experiment involving beagles and the side effects of contraceptive pills. Animal research ethics aside, beagles might be a good start.
Sadly, one researcher at Deakin in the 1970s didn’t think so. Michael Briggs fabricated and published his data and the deception was only admitted in the mid-1980s. It seems in Australia we could be about to see another case of the beagle that didn’t bark - with one researcher facing fraud charges in court today. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:34 - - Permalien [#]

Buying essays: how to make sure assessment is authentic

The ConversationUniversities have complex processes to discover when students cheat. They apply those processes to a range of assessments, particularly to discover plagiarism. However, there is a clear answer if universities want to ensure that all students do their own work – and that’s by changing to what educators call authentic assessment. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:32 - - Permalien [#]

Feeding the beast: why plagiarism rips off readers too

The ConversationBy now you’ve likely heard about psychiatrist and columnist Tanveer Ahmed’s recent opinion piece in The Australian in which he effectively blamed radical feminism for domestic violence. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:30 - - Permalien [#]


Policing won’t be enough to prevent pay-for plagiarism

The ConversationRecently, it was revealed that high school students in NSW are buying essays made-to-order online for little more than A$100. University assignments can be more expensive, costing up to $1000 from the controversial (and now-defunct) MyMaster website. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:27 - - Permalien [#]

Policing plagiarism could make universities miss the real problems

The ConversationPlagiarism regularly makes the headlines and universities are under pressure to tackle the problem decisively. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:25 - - Permalien [#]

Dishonest academics may make students think plagiarism is acceptable

The ConversationUniversities are constantly implementing new measures to stop student plagiarism. Students learn how to correctly cite sources and receive copies of the institution’s academic integrity code. They are helped with their academic writing skills, particularly if the language of instruction is not the same as their first language. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:25 - - Permalien [#]

Forget plagiarism: there’s a new and bigger threat to academic integrity

The ConversationAcademic plagiarism is no longer just sloppy “cut and paste” jobs or students cribbing large chunks of an assignment from a friend’s earlier essay on the same topic. These days, students can simply visit any of a number of paper or essay mills that litter the internet and buy a completed assignment to present as their own. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:24 - - Permalien [#]

Delusions of candour: why technology won’t stop plagiarism

The ConversationPlagiarism at university is a time-old scourge. Some would have us believe it can be sought out with ever-improving technology, and with more consistent vetting of student essays with the latest detection software. But beneath these appeals to superior forensic intelligence lies an unhappy fallacy – that a technological fix can address a moral problem. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:23 - - Permalien [#]