23 septembre 2018

Predicting Reproducibility

HomeBy Rachael Pells for Times Higher Education. Academics are easily able to predict whether an experiment’s findings will be reproducible, according to a study that raises more questions about the reliability of research published in leading journals. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 20:13 - - Permalien [#]


Rejecting a Journal

HomeBy Rachael Pells for Times Higher Education. A journal is at risk of closure after its publisher, with whom its editors had crossed swords on several occasions, dropped the title. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 20:11 - - Permalien [#]

22 septembre 2018

Les publications du CARIF Espace Compétences

carif espace-compétencesLes publications du CARIF Espace Compétences. Plus...

Posté par pcassuto à 23:44 - - Permalien [#]

ORM - Publications

Logo ORMPublications

Posté par pcassuto à 17:05 - - Permalien [#]

21 septembre 2018

The Potential of Personal Publishing in Education II: How’s It Going & What’s Working?

The Potential of Personal Publishing in Education II: How’s It Going & What’s Working?
This look at the use of weblogs in learning takes a close, critical look and the results aren't all peaches and cream. The most telling link is to the list of updated schoolblogs, showing (as of my reading) that out of the 2,400 or so listed, the most recent update was back in July. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:29 - - Permalien [#]


In Search of Solutions for Scholarly Publishing

In Search of Solutions for Scholarly Publishing
Trandscript of the discussion with Cathy Davidson, author of the article Understanding the Economic Burden of Scholarly Publishing, covered here last week. Some fascinating (and puzzling) comments: "In the short run, once commercial publishers find they cannot price-gauge, I'm sure they will get out of the business." Um, no, that's not how it works. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 11:00 - - Permalien [#]

Traffic Overwhelms New Online Science Journal

Traffic Overwhelms New Online Science Journal
Imagine. An academic journal on the subject of biology gets a million hits in a single day. Biology, even! In what may mark the most popular day in the history of the subject, the Public Library of Science Biology journal, the first to be launched by PLoS, was swamped by the widespread interest on its first day. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:21 - - Permalien [#]

On-line Publishing in the 21st Century

On-line Publishing in the 21st Century
Nice article about the contradictions between traditional publication models and the possibilities inherent in the web. The two mix together, notes the author, about as well as oil and water. So long as they see no role for themselves, publishers will continue to complain (incorrectly) that the new distribution model is flawed. But their role post-internet is becoming clearer. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:19 - - Permalien [#]

18 septembre 2018

Not enough diverse academic research is being published

By Jenny J Lee and Alma Maldonado-Maldonado. As Philip Altbach and Hans de Wit wrote recently, there is a crisis in academic publishing. But the problems are much worse than the authors contend. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:11 - - Permalien [#]

17 septembre 2018

Why limiting the number of academic publications would be a grave mistake

By Brendan O’Malley – Managing Editor. In Commentary, Jenny J Lee and Alma Maldonado-Maldonado disagree with Philip Altbach and Hans de Wit that too much academic research is being published, saying that reducing research publications overall would reinforce issues of dominance of the global knowledge production system by the Global North. Ellen Hazelkorn, Hamish Coates and Alexander C McCormick ask whether the prevailing approaches to higher education quality assurance are still ‘fit for purpose’ and how we can better measure important outcomes and compare them across countries. Linda J Børresen and Stig Arne Skjerven say while fake university degrees will continue to pose a threat to higher education in the years to come, recent initiatives involving digital diplomas in secure databases hold promise for combating false qualifications in the future. Anatol Itten writes that many universities make the mistake of applying the same methods to resolve conflicts over values as conflicts over facts – they should rather step back and use mediators who may be able to find some overarching common ground. And Joanne Pyke and Kate White contend that implementing gender targets and quotas in the recruitment of academics in Australian universities will speed up progress in achieving gender equity.
   In our World Blog, Nita Temmerman says universities in developing countries should not overlook the expertise within their own institution that can support the development of a quality curriculum and ensure successful external programme accreditation.
   In Features, Maina Waruru reports that African scholars were cautioned against falling prey to predatory journals by Professor Jennifer Thomson, president of the Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World, at a research grants conference in Tanzania. And Geoff Maslen reports that Australian students, unlike their counterparts in other countries, are reluctant to study outside their own nation, preferring Sydney or Melbourne to anywhere else in the world. More...

Posté par pcassuto à 08:19 - - Permalien [#]